The ‘Great Dismantler’ – Can A Liberal Order Be Rebuilt after the ‘Age of Trump’

It has become clear where Trump’s policies are taking us – or as clear as one can be when it comes to interpreting Trump policy.  Trump is breaking the structures and  policy frameworks of America’s existing domestic and foreign policies.  The question is less whether he can accomplish some measure of this, then what will  it take future US leaders, assuming they are willing, to rebuild the institutions and policies that have been constructed over the past seven decades.  As Tom Friedman of the NYT recently declared:

Moreover, when you break big systems, which, albeit imperfectly, have stabilized regions, environments or industries for decades, it can be very difficult to restore them.

The litany of destruction by this President is now  all too familiar.  In his first day in office after his inaugurated, Trump withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership.  He now appears to be targeting for destruction the NAFTA before the rather hapless Mexican and Canadian leaders.  And the South Korea-US free trade agreement appears to be next for the chopping bloc, notwithstanding the need it would seem to maintain close alliance support in the face of the North Korea’s nuclear and missile ambitions and US efforts to force DPRK denuclearization.

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N-11 and the Global Financial Crisis

 Late in 2005, Goldman Sachs (GS) introduced the concept of the N-11. As described by Dominic Wilson and Anna Stupnytska in the GS Global Economics Paper, No. 153  (March 28, 2007), “The N-11: More than an Acronym.”*

The N-11 appeared to be a GS effort to introduce a further tier of emerging economies and determine whether the next group of large developing countries with large populations had the potential to become ‘BRIC-like.’  Their summary conclusion:


“The diversity of the N-11 makes it difficult to generalise. But our projections confirm that many of them do have interesting potential growth stories, alongside reasonable scale, although their prospects vary widely and some face much greater challenges than others.  …Of the N-11, only Mexico, Korea and, to a lesser degree, Turkey and Vietnam have both the potential and the conditions to rival the current major economies or the BRICs themselves. Other N-11 economies – Indonesia and Nigeria in particular – have the scale to be important if they can deliver sustained growth. But while the rest of the N-11 may not have a BRIC-like impact any time soon, the Continue reading