Monthly Archives: May 2006

Multilateralism and the Absence of Disapproval

Multilateralism and unilateralism constitute attitudes towards the external world.  It is interesting to see how these fit with other characterizations.  Jeff Legro presented a paper at UCLA’s international relations workshop and he distinguished three types of states: trustees, hermits, and … Continue reading

Posted in Global Governance for G20/G8, Guest Blogger | Leave a comment

Defining Disapproval and Looking at Reform

So Art has now clarified his thinking on the unilatreral/multilateral disjuncture.  It is clear that Art avoids looking just at acting alone in the case of unilateral.  So the distinction – or in otherwords legitimate action -  is embedded in  … Continue reading

Posted in Global Governance for G20/G8 | Leave a comment

What’s new in multilateralism?

I think that the current system is multilateral, which shapes how actors perceive what is appropriate. States do not invent a new response to each new problem. I have been puzzled since last fall, therefore, by the concept of a … Continue reading

Posted in Global Governance for G20/G8 | Leave a comment

Common Values and the Limits of Differentiated Collective Action

Patti Goff has raised a number of interesting points and so I am posting this extended response as a separate item. It deals with, 1) whether multilateralism implies the non-use of force, and 2) what tactical division of labor is consistent with my argument that agreement on policy as well as objective is a prerequisite for multilateralism. More specifically, I address whether and what kind of departures from collective action are consistent with multilateralism. Continue reading

Posted in Global Governance for G20/G8, Guest Blogger | Leave a comment