Monthly Archives: June 2006

Multilateralism may be an Existential Reality but Unilateralism is Open to One and All – AAS

The analytic question is whether there is an option of unilateralism versus multilateralism, and secondarily whether it is available to all states or is only the luxury of a hegemonic power such as the US. I want to argue what … Continue reading

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The Social Psychology of Small Groups and International Relations

I attended a talk by a sociologist, Noah Friedkin (UCSB), discussing the structure of influence in networks and groups and his findings strike me as interesting for our discussion of multilateralism. Friedkin has done experiments in which people are asked … Continue reading

Posted in Global Governance for G20/G8, Guest Blogger | Leave a comment

Domestic Politics and Multilateralism/Unilateralism

This post explores the relationship between domestic politics and a multilateral or unilateral foreign policy (and the pursuit of multilateral or unilateral solutions to problems). One way to cut into this question is to ask whether political leaders are punished … Continue reading

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What is New in the New Multilateralism? A partial answer

Bob Wolfe asks an important questions, what is new in the new multilateralism. One of his answers has to do with how the term is currently being used by different governments and different ends of the political spectrum. The tack … Continue reading

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The Legacy of Bretton Woods

CIGI Conferenc, Waterloo, Ontario June 9-10 2006 The “par value” exchange rate system designed in 1944 ended long ago, but the legacy of Bretton Woods persists in the International Monetary Fund, particularly in its core surveillance function. From the beginning, … Continue reading

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